Two steps forward, one step back

This learning block represents one week’s work. Aim to watch at least one video and choose at least one activity or project to complete. 

Watch The Video…

Maybe you’ve heard the term “privilege,” but wonder what it really means. In this lesson we’re going to explore the concept of privilege and what that means to the life of an individual and their role in a community. Let’s dive in!

Choose some activities

Activity #1: Watch the What is privilege Video

Reflect:

What was the most interesting thing you learned from the video?

Activity #2:Do the Privilege Walk (Privilege Points Exercise)

This is usually an exercise where you get up and move around, but today we’re going to use points:

  1. Add 1 point if your ancestors were forced to come to the U.S., add 3 points if your ancestors came willingly to America.
  2. Add 3 points, if when you learned about the history of this country and of civilization in general your racial group was primarily represented, if not add 1 point.
  3. Add 3 points if you can be pretty sure you or a family member who looks like you will not be followed by store security while shopping because of your race, add 1 point if you can’t be sure.
  4. Add 3 points if the color “nude” refers to your skin color, add 1 point if it does not.
  5. Add 3 points if when in school you received materials that taught you the history of your race, add 1 point if you rarely received materials that taught you the history of your race.
  6. Add 3 points if in most cases when you ask to speak with the person in charge you will be facing a person of your race, add 1 point if in most cases you would not be facing a person of your race.
  7. Add 3 points if a cop pulls you over you can be pretty sure you weren’t singled out because of your race, add 1 point if you may very well be singled out because of your race.

Source: Tam Warner Minton 

Watch:

Heartbreaking Moment When Kids Learn About White Privilege | The School That Tried to End Racism

Watch:

If someone doesn’t understand privilege, show them this:

Activity #3: Privileges for Sale 

You have $50 dollars to spend on different privileges. Each privilege costs $10. Which privileges do you buy from the following list?

  1. I see positive images of people who look like me in books, movies and TV
  2. I can find band aids that match my skin color
  3. I have plenty of role models who match my gender identity or ethnicity
  4. When I learn about history I know that people who look like me made a positive contribution
  5. Everyday language matches my gender identity
  6. I can walk around my neighborhood at night without worrying about safety
  7. I can look at items in a shop without worrying about being accused of a crime
  8. Most of the people I hang out with match my gender identity
  9. Most of the people I hang out with look like me
  10. If I need to speak to someone in charge, the person I speak to will look like me

    Reflection:

    • How did these activities make you feel?
    • What did you learn in relation to privilege?
    • Why do you think the amount of money was randomly assigned?
    • Did anything surprise you?
    • What would you add to this list of privileges?

    Challenge:

    • How can you use your privilege to help others with less privilege?

    Further reading:

    Listen:

    Excerpt from I Can't Ignore Racism